parenting tips - chore chart

Chore chart sample

It can be really annoying for you to ask your child again and again to finish their tasks without them ever getting done.  If this scenario is a day-to-day occurance at your home, as parents you may want to consider designing a chore chart. Chores for your child might comprise of  taking out the rubbishes, washing dishes, tidying their room, yard work or putting dirty clothes in the laundry room. Each one of the chore has to be carry out only one time or two times in a week. Anything more is unrealistic.

Once your child finishes every chore, they can put a tick on the chore chart or to make it a lot more interesting for your child, you can supply them with colorful stickers with attractive symbols or cartoon characters which they can embellish the chore chart with every chores completion. At the end of every week, it is very inspiring for both parents and child to take a look at the chore chart and simply see that for each one of the assigned task was accomplished.  Exactly similar our ‘to do’ lists, your child will attain great contentment in being able to tick off or add colorful stickers for each task as it’s completed and rejoice knowing that they had accomplished a set or list of chores.

When you have discussed and planned a chore chart with your child, it is time to talk about the rewards for fulfilling every chores listed.  Perchance at your home you choose to give a set amount of money for each task completed.  If you should decide to grant your child some kind of monetary allowance, be sure it’s age fitting and awarded on a regular basis. An effective guideline is fifty cents per year of age.  Thus your eight year old child would earn $4.00 per week whenever each chore on the list has been carried out.  If they did not completed all their tasks in the chore chart, no reward should be given to them.

This is an excellent chance for parents to educate your children the value of both earning and saving money, as well as giving back.  Parents can instruct the child to separate their allowance into three portions: one-third for spending, one-third for saving, and another one-third for the use to assist those whom more inauspicious than them.  Parents may also would like to consider designing a ‘bank book’ for each alloted sum of the reward and gather each one into three separate piggy banks or money jars. That method will help both parents and child to keep track of how much has been saved, how much has been spent, and how much of the reward have been used to aid another person.

Should you settled to apply non-monetary incentives for the chores reward, make certain you set an apparent constraints for your child.  Be sure they comprehend that three hours each weekend of their favourite video games or going to watch a film with mommy or daddy is only gained by completing the chore list successfully weekly.  You might want to consider writing these on a slip of paper as ‘currency’ for the child to keep in their ‘privilege bank’ and they can cash it in with you when they’d like.
No matter what sort of method you select, keep in mind this can be a priceless tool for both you and your child.

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Find and print your chore charts here:

  • http://www.chartjungle.com/chores.html
  • http://simplemom.net/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/preschoolers-chore-chart.pdf